Flowers

Product Profile: Astilbe

Written by Rona Wheeldon
July 22, 2016

In this month's Product Profile, we're taking a look at astilbe, which is currently in season. With its delicate feathery plumes, it's a popular filler flower, perfect for adding texture to designs. 

White Astilbe Washington at New Covent Garden Flower Market July 2016

Background

From the Saxifragaceae family, the name 'astilbe' comes from the Greek 'a' meaning without and 'stilbe' meaning brilliance, which is quite surprising considering the flower's elegant nature. Some people put it down to the fact that the name refers to the lack of showiness in the original Chinese flowers, whilst others comment that it's because each flower on its own is very tiny and insignificant. 

Astilbe is available in white, pale pink, dark pink and red, with the most in-demand variety being the powdery pink, Europa. You'll usually find this delicate bloom at the Market from May to September/October, in wraps of ten stems. 

As plants, from the end of March until mid May, they're available in white, pink and red. 

Types

Here are some of the varieties which you'll find at the Market...

Fanal

Deep Red Fanal Astilbe at New Covent Garden Flower Market July 2016

Else Schluck

Deep Pink Else Schluck Astilbe at New Covent Garden Flower Market July 2016

Elisabeth van Veen

Cerise Elisabeth van Veen Astilbe at New Covent Garden Flower Market July 2016

Amethyst

Pink Amethyst Astilbe at New Covent Garden Flower Market July 2016

Erika

Pale Pink Erika Astilbe at New Covent Garden Flower Market July 2016

Bressingham Beauty

Pink Bressingham Beauty Astilbe at New Covent Garden Flower Market July 2016

Peach Blossom

Pink Peach Blossom Astilbe at New Covent Garden Flower Market July 2016

Europa

Pale Pink Europa Astilbe at New Covent Garden Flower Market July 2016

Washington (sometimes you may see it referred to as Whashingthon)

White Astilbe Washington at New Covent Garden Flower Market July 2016

General Advice

Ronny at Bloomfield says: "Astilbe like a lot of water, as they originally used to grow in bogs. And if you're not careful, their foliage can dry out. So make sure that you keep the vases they're in topped up with water."

To help to avoid the tips of your astilbe going brown, you can dip their stems in Quick Dip when you condition them. And if you find that your astilbe starts to droop, try re-cutting the stems and placing them in warm water. 

Design Inspiration

More often than not used as a filler flower in hand-tied bouquets, table arrangements, candelabra designs and bridal bouquets, this frothy flower can also hold its own as a focal flower. Check out this stunning bridesmaid's bouquet

Here are some examples of beautiful designs using astilbe...

Scarlet & Violet Instagram

(Source: Scarlet & Violet)

Catherine Muller Flower School London

(Source: Catherine Muller Flower School London)

Zita Elze Instagram

(Source: Zita Elze)

By Appointment Only Design Instagram

(Source: Tony Marklew | By Appointment Only Design)

Jay Archer Instagram

(Source: Jay Archer)

Paul Thomas Flowers Instagram

(Source: Paul Thomas Flowers)

Sweet Pea Flowers Instagram

(Source: Sweet Pea Flowers)

Your Photos

Tammy Weaver of TMS Events design using Astilbe

(Source: Tammy Weaver | TMS Events)

Tania McLaren of The KitchenTable Florist design using Astilbe

(Source: Tania McLaren | The Kitchen Table Florist)

Sophie Townsend designs using Astilbe

(Source: Sophie Townsend Flowers)

We'd love to see photos of arrangements that you've made using astilbe from New Covent Garden Flower Market. Simply send an email to info@cgma.co.uk, stating your company name and website address. Or if you prefer, you could post your photo on Twitter and copy us in, by including @MarketFlowers in your tweet. We'll then upload your photos into this section.

I hope you've enjoyed reading this month's Product Profile. Please do ask away below if you have any questions or would like to make any general comments. As always, we'd love to hear from you...

P.S. Did you know that the common name for astilbe is false goat's beard?!

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